Even Jean Paul Gaultier says ‘adieu’ to fur

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That Jean Paul Gaultier has decided to ban natural leather and fur from his collections, it has been known for some days, exactly since November 10th when, during the ‘Bonsoir’ show on the French television, the designer announced that he no longer wanted to use animal skin and fur, because the way animals are killed for this purpose “is deplorable”.

Jean Paul Gaultier – credits Captain Catan from Frankfurt am Main

Since here at eco-à-porter we do not have a race to publish a news first because this is not our purpose, we write it today, quietly and happily, going to add Jean Paul Gaultier to the list of famous names that in this last year have said goodbye to natural fur.

Armani, Versace, Michael Kors, Gucci, Burberry, there are many luxury brands that have approached a cruelty-free fashion after years of pressure from animal rights associations, first of all PETA, whose activists have made several incursions during the shows of these designers and also of Gaultier himself.

Let’s say that the French designer has not issued an official press release in this regard, but a declaration of this kind, made during a TV show, in front of millions of people, has the same value if not greater. PETA then took this step for a definitive moment and we too, mais oui, assume it (but we will watch over the next collections of Gaultier😉).

Of course, only recently becoming aware of the atrocious suffering of thousands of animals tortured and killed just for fashion and vanity sounds more like a marketing operation that straddles the trends more and more echo of the moment but better late than never.

What matters to us at this rate is that there will be always more of fur farms going to close down; one of the last countries to decree the end was Belgium last July at the initiative of the Flemish Minister for animal welfare Ben Weyts.

The last 17 farms still active in Flanders and causing the death of at least 200,000 minks a year, will have to close down by 2023. Last month also Luxembourg banned them and Norway, once the largest producer in the world of fox fur, voted at the beginning of the year to outlaw the rearing of fur animals since 2024 (again, better late than never).

Italy is missing, the usual latecomers in things that should be excelled; although a legislative bill has already been filed by more than one political group, about twenty mink farms continue to remain active, causing the death of at least 200,000 animals a year (about 550 every single day). Perhaps it would take more pressing.

However, the general trend shows that the animal fur doesn’t have any time left, so who has not yet realized it or pretends not to have understood it, open his eyes and start thinking about a new way to warm up his customers. There are many possibilities.

 

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